Universal Access to Reproductive Health Services

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

Theme 2012

The Day of 5 Billion was marked with a lot of interest in July 1987. This led to a Resolution 89/46, in 1989, by the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme, which recommended that 11 July should be observed as World Population Day.

This year, World Population Day was celebrated on 11th July 2012 themed Universal access to Reproductive health services, pushing UNFPA’s vision, a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled. It was marked by The London Summit on Family Planning co sponsored by The Bill & Melinda Gates foundation, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UK Aid and UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFiD).

 Facts

Access to sexual and reproductive health is a key element to the fight against poverty. According to UNFPA, some 222 million women…

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It Takes A Village: Let’s Commit to End Child Marriage

Girls' Globe

By: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

Last week, I joined thousands of maternal and child health advocates at the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) Partners’ Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. The gathering and robust discussions breathed life into the African Proverb: “It takes a village to raise a child.” The various stakeholders present called for ambitious and transformative commitments to realize the potential to be the ‘village’ that ends early, forced and child marriages in one generation, as this contributes to preventable newborn deaths and maternal mortality.

Until Death Do Us Apart: Facts and Figures

  • One in three girls in the developing world will be married by their eighteenth birthday. This can end their chance of completing an education and puts them at greater risk of isolation and violence.
  • One in seven girls in the developing…

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Youth Voices at PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014

Girls' Globe

We have been present at the PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014 in Johannesburg, South Africa this week, where close to 200 youth delegates participated and advocated to include youth priorities in the post-2015 agenda. We had the opportunity to be inspired by their leadership and hear their views and recommendations. .

Gogontlejang Phaladi, Botswana

Mohammed Magdy El Khayat, Egypt

Cecilia Garcia Ruiz, Mexico

1. The global community has made significant progress in saving the lives of women and children. What do you think stands out as a key accomplishment?

2. What are some broader economic, health and social benefits from investing in women’s and children’s health?

3. Remaining gaps can be solved through partnership. Globally, where is political will and commitment for children’s health needed most?

Zanele Mabaso, South Africa

Sumaya Saluja, India

Felogene Anumo, Kenya

Felogene reads the youth recommendations that were put together at the Youth Pre-Forum on June 29th, prior to…

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Commit to Deliver for Young Girls & Women in the Post-2015 Agenda

Girls' Globe

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 9.58.51 AMBy: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

The Millennium Development Goals have been the central reference point for global development efforts and have had success in drawing attention to poverty as an urgent global priority. Though the world has made progress towards achieving the MDGs, more can and must be done, especially with regards to addressing the needs of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young women and girls.

The importance of adolescents’ access to SRHR is a key element to the fight against poverty.

About 1.8 billion young people are entering their reproductive years, often without the knowledge, skills and services they need to protect themselves. Among the root causes of current high rates of maternal and newborn mortality are unintended pregnancies — particularly among girls and adolescents. According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 800 women die…

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