Education Under Attack: #147NotJustaNumber #BringBackOurGirls

Read my thoughts on why the impact of the latest terror attacks on schools will have far reaching negative consequences on the education sector. #147NotJustaNumber #BringBackOurGirls

Sadly, linked to the crippling fear of attacks, 1 student succumbed to injuries while more than 120 students were injured during a stampede at a hostel in the University of Nairobi’s Kikuyu campus in an attempt to flee from alleged terrorists. The scare was as a result of “gun-like” explosions from an electric fault which sparked panic among students in the wee hours of April 12, 2015, who feared they had been attacked by gunmen.

 

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

“Getting a good education is my best bet out of poverty,” said a 16- year old in Narok county in Kenya. Yet, on that fateful morning of 2nd April 2005 at Garissa University in Kenya, the dreams of 147 lives and their families were shattered into pieces. As I followed the events unfolding that morning and subsequent media coverage, I was overcome by a deep sadness and anger by the loss of young lives. Lives of young people and families who were filled with hope and promise that education brings.

Education Under Attack

We live in a world characterized by uncertainty, complexity and rapid change. For many young people, and more often in developing countries, education is the base and its importance for self and society cannot be overstated. For me, the decision of attackers to target institutions of learning where tolerance, co-existence and unity is fostered is…

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Youth Voices: The Importance of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health

Girls' Globe

There is a movement stirring in the global community to build a new strategy to address maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health around the world. One of these mechanisms is the proposed Global Financing Facility (The GFF). The GFF in support of Every Woman Every Child aims to contribute to global efforts to improve the lives of women, children. With more resources effectively allocated towards innovative solutions and programs it is estimated that 4 million maternal deaths, 107 million child deaths and 22 million stillbirths can be prevented between 2015-2030 in over seventy countries.

While significant progress has been made to improve the the health of women, children and adolescents, there is still more that needs to be done. Youth voices are vital to this global conversation. Young people around the world are already doing amazing work to empower communities and save lives. Often with little resources, youth are making an enormous impact in…

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‘The Bachelor’ Group Date that Nobody is Talking About

The role of media in perpetuating sexism and gender inequalities! SMH.

Girls' Globe

The Bachelor contestants get ready to ride tractors in the bikinis in downtown Los Angeles. Image c/o ABC. The Bachelor contestants get ready to ride tractors in bikinis in downtown Los Angeles. Image c/o ABC.

Okay, I have to confession to make. I watch The Bachelor and I admittedly *guiltily* enjoy it. With my glass (bottle?) of wine beside me, I go into these episodes with an understanding that what I am about to witness will be completely sexist and will inevitably stereotype its female cast members as backstabbers, crazy, drunkards, airheads, damsels in distress, and/or the I’m-here-for-the-right-reasons-and-am-innocently-looking-for-my-one-true-love girl. (Why else would anyone ever want to be cast on a high ranking national television show? Certainly not for the five minutes of fame.)

However, a portion of last Monday’s episode was a little harder to stomach than usual.

Chris Soules, dubbed the handsome and perfect bachelor (a.k.a. Prince Farming…because he lives on a farm, get it?), invited a group of six girls on the season’s first group date with a date card that read…

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Unpaid, Unrecognized, Undervalued: Women and Girls’ Care Work

Enjoy!

Girls' Globe

Nafula, a young twenty-five year old from Chavakali, Kenya begins her day at 4a.m. Before the sun rises, she walks more than 2 kilometres to the borehole where 20 other women are already in the queue. It takes one hour for her to collect water for the day. With a 5 month old child on her back, a twenty litre container on her head and a small five litre container, she hurries home to prepare breakfast for her husband and two children. After completing the housework and tilling the family land, Nafula will

Photo Credit: Aresene Coseac, Flickr Creative Commons Photo Credit: Aresene Coseac, Flickr Creative Commons

make her way to the nearby hospital which is ten kilometres away. It is also her responsibility to care for her father-in law’s health. After his daily doctor’s appointment, her husband and children will arrive at home for dinner. Although every life is unique, Nafula’s story is similar to many women and girls.

The Labor of…

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If You Treasure It, Measure It: #Commit2Deliver for Women and Girls

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No country sends its soldiers to war to protect their country without seeing to it that they will return safely, and yet mankind for centuries has been sending women to battle to renew the human resource without protecting them. -Fred Sai, former President of the International Planned Parenthood Federation

Pregnancy is the one of the leading causes of death for girls aged 15-19 in developing countries. Maternal and child mortality remains a big problem for many countries in Africa with young women even more vulnerable. However, almost all maternal deaths can be prevented, as evidenced by the huge disparities found between the richest and poorest countries. The lifetime risk of maternal death in industrialized countries is 1 in 4,000 in comparison to 1 in 51 in countries classified as ‘least developed.’

Why We Cannot Wait

Mothers are the cornerstones of healthy societies. Not only do they give physical birth to new life, they…

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Ignorance is Not Innocence: Importance of Sexuality Education

Girls' Globe

Felogene Post2 Photo Credit: Suzanne Majani

Let us face it: Sex is everywhere. Music videos, television adverts, movies, online pornography, characters in games. Did you know that nine out of ten children aged between eight and sixteen have viewed pornography on the Internet? As a result, young people are receiving conflicting messages on their sexuality, view on relationships, identity and gender. With the evolution of the information age, young people can now transfer information freely and have instant access to knowledge that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to find. The repercussions are vast and varying, not limited to early sexual debut, teenage pregnancies, spread of HIV/AIDS, increased vulnerabilities to sexual abuse and risky sexual behavior.

Education is a central determinant for behavior change. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) identifies the primary goal of sexuality education as that “children and young people become equipped with the knowledge, skills and values to make…

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Universal Access to Reproductive Health Services

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

Theme 2012

The Day of 5 Billion was marked with a lot of interest in July 1987. This led to a Resolution 89/46, in 1989, by the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme, which recommended that 11 July should be observed as World Population Day.

This year, World Population Day was celebrated on 11th July 2012 themed Universal access to Reproductive health services, pushing UNFPA’s vision, a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth safe, and every young person’s potential is fulfilled. It was marked by The London Summit on Family Planning co sponsored by The Bill & Melinda Gates foundation, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), UK Aid and UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFiD).

 Facts

Access to sexual and reproductive health is a key element to the fight against poverty. According to UNFPA, some 222 million women…

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It Takes A Village: Let’s Commit to End Child Marriage

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By: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

Last week, I joined thousands of maternal and child health advocates at the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) Partners’ Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. The gathering and robust discussions breathed life into the African Proverb: “It takes a village to raise a child.” The various stakeholders present called for ambitious and transformative commitments to realize the potential to be the ‘village’ that ends early, forced and child marriages in one generation, as this contributes to preventable newborn deaths and maternal mortality.

Until Death Do Us Apart: Facts and Figures

  • One in three girls in the developing world will be married by their eighteenth birthday. This can end their chance of completing an education and puts them at greater risk of isolation and violence.
  • One in seven girls in the developing…

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Youth Voices at PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014

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We have been present at the PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014 in Johannesburg, South Africa this week, where close to 200 youth delegates participated and advocated to include youth priorities in the post-2015 agenda. We had the opportunity to be inspired by their leadership and hear their views and recommendations. .

Gogontlejang Phaladi, Botswana

Mohammed Magdy El Khayat, Egypt

Cecilia Garcia Ruiz, Mexico

1. The global community has made significant progress in saving the lives of women and children. What do you think stands out as a key accomplishment?

2. What are some broader economic, health and social benefits from investing in women’s and children’s health?

3. Remaining gaps can be solved through partnership. Globally, where is political will and commitment for children’s health needed most?

Zanele Mabaso, South Africa

Sumaya Saluja, India

Felogene Anumo, Kenya

Felogene reads the youth recommendations that were put together at the Youth Pre-Forum on June 29th, prior to…

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Commit to Deliver for Young Girls & Women in the Post-2015 Agenda

Girls' Globe

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 9.58.51 AMBy: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

The Millennium Development Goals have been the central reference point for global development efforts and have had success in drawing attention to poverty as an urgent global priority. Though the world has made progress towards achieving the MDGs, more can and must be done, especially with regards to addressing the needs of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young women and girls.

The importance of adolescents’ access to SRHR is a key element to the fight against poverty.

About 1.8 billion young people are entering their reproductive years, often without the knowledge, skills and services they need to protect themselves. Among the root causes of current high rates of maternal and newborn mortality are unintended pregnancies — particularly among girls and adolescents. According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 800 women die…

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