Ignorance is Not Innocence: Importance of Sexuality Education

Girls' Globe

Felogene Post2 Photo Credit: Suzanne Majani

Let us face it: Sex is everywhere. Music videos, television adverts, movies, online pornography, characters in games. Did you know that nine out of ten children aged between eight and sixteen have viewed pornography on the Internet? As a result, young people are receiving conflicting messages on their sexuality, view on relationships, identity and gender. With the evolution of the information age, young people can now transfer information freely and have instant access to knowledge that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to find. The repercussions are vast and varying, not limited to early sexual debut, teenage pregnancies, spread of HIV/AIDS, increased vulnerabilities to sexual abuse and risky sexual behavior.

Education is a central determinant for behavior change. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) identifies the primary goal of sexuality education as that “children and young people become equipped with the knowledge, skills and values to make…

View original post 373 more words

Advertisements

It Takes A Village: Let’s Commit to End Child Marriage

Girls' Globe

By: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

Last week, I joined thousands of maternal and child health advocates at the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) Partners’ Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. The gathering and robust discussions breathed life into the African Proverb: “It takes a village to raise a child.” The various stakeholders present called for ambitious and transformative commitments to realize the potential to be the ‘village’ that ends early, forced and child marriages in one generation, as this contributes to preventable newborn deaths and maternal mortality.

Until Death Do Us Apart: Facts and Figures

  • One in three girls in the developing world will be married by their eighteenth birthday. This can end their chance of completing an education and puts them at greater risk of isolation and violence.
  • One in seven girls in the developing…

View original post 319 more words

Youth Voices at PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014

Girls' Globe

We have been present at the PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014 in Johannesburg, South Africa this week, where close to 200 youth delegates participated and advocated to include youth priorities in the post-2015 agenda. We had the opportunity to be inspired by their leadership and hear their views and recommendations. .

Gogontlejang Phaladi, Botswana

Mohammed Magdy El Khayat, Egypt

Cecilia Garcia Ruiz, Mexico

1. The global community has made significant progress in saving the lives of women and children. What do you think stands out as a key accomplishment?

2. What are some broader economic, health and social benefits from investing in women’s and children’s health?

3. Remaining gaps can be solved through partnership. Globally, where is political will and commitment for children’s health needed most?

Zanele Mabaso, South Africa

Sumaya Saluja, India

Felogene Anumo, Kenya

Felogene reads the youth recommendations that were put together at the Youth Pre-Forum on June 29th, prior to…

View original post 93 more words

Commit to Deliver for Young Girls & Women in the Post-2015 Agenda

Girls' Globe

Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 9.58.51 AMBy: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

The Millennium Development Goals have been the central reference point for global development efforts and have had success in drawing attention to poverty as an urgent global priority. Though the world has made progress towards achieving the MDGs, more can and must be done, especially with regards to addressing the needs of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of young women and girls.

The importance of adolescents’ access to SRHR is a key element to the fight against poverty.

About 1.8 billion young people are entering their reproductive years, often without the knowledge, skills and services they need to protect themselves. Among the root causes of current high rates of maternal and newborn mortality are unintended pregnancies — particularly among girls and adolescents. According to the World Health Organisation, approximately 800 women die…

View original post 342 more words

Post 2015 Processes – Opportunity for Kenyan Women?

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

The High Level Panel recently presented to the UN Secretary General a report with recommendations of what they envisage for the Post 2015 framework.

The next stage of handing over the process to the UN Open Working Group and Member States leading up to the September Special Session on the MDGs requires vigilance and active engagement. Civil society organizations need to galvanize people to sign on and own this framework to ensure that the text does not get watered down. Women especially stand a lot to gain including especially with the inclusion of a stand-alone gender goal as well as disaggregated indicators in other goals. Eliminating violence against women and ending child marriage are included as indicators and the panel has gone beyond previous commitments to recommend universal access to contraception and sexual and reproductive health rights.

Kenya is a Co-chair to the Intergovernmental UN Open Working…

View original post 210 more words

A RENEWED COMMITMENT: INTERNATIONAL MOTHER’S DAY

FEMNET

Felo & Baby

By Felogene Anumo

Exactly eight months ago, September 11, 2014 I was blessed with the most precious gift in this world, a lovely BABY GIRL. Today also marks International Mother’s Day, an occasion to pay tribute and offer gratitude to mothers. Even as I hold her close and cherish all the special memories created and milestones celebrated, my heart bleeds because of the world we live in. A world where systemic inequalities persist, crimes against humanity such as kidnapping of women and girls for sexual and other unlawful purposes, senseless killings and acts of terrorism are the order of the day.

My heart bleeds for the households and families for the 276 girls from the town of Chibok in Borno State, Nigeria who will be denied this opportunity because their daughters have been missing for over three weeks with much inaction from the Government of Nigeria. The same government in…

View original post 308 more words

The “Dirty” Situation of Women and Girls: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in the Post 2015 Development Framework

FEMNET

 

 

Image

“The place where we went before is about 6km from here. It was threatening and dirty. It was frightening too so most of the time we went with friends. There are men who are not really nice. When they see lonely women there they rape them or something like that. I know that something like that already happened. I don’t want my daughter to go to that place because I’m afraid of her being raped. I’m teaching her to always use the toilet instead.” -Madeleine is a young mother. Her family recently had a toilet built next to their house[1]

In the developing world, the burden of collecting water, falls disproportionately on women and girls particularly for families without a drinking-water source at home. According to WHO/UNICEF 2012, Sub-Saharan African countries indicated that around 71% of the water collected is done so by women and girls. In…

View original post 424 more words