Post 2015 Processes – Opportunity for Kenyan Women?

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

The High Level Panel recently presented to the UN Secretary General a report with recommendations of what they envisage for the Post 2015 framework.

The next stage of handing over the process to the UN Open Working Group and Member States leading up to the September Special Session on the MDGs requires vigilance and active engagement. Civil society organizations need to galvanize people to sign on and own this framework to ensure that the text does not get watered down. Women especially stand a lot to gain including especially with the inclusion of a stand-alone gender goal as well as disaggregated indicators in other goals. Eliminating violence against women and ending child marriage are included as indicators and the panel has gone beyond previous commitments to recommend universal access to contraception and sexual and reproductive health rights.

Kenya is a Co-chair to the Intergovernmental UN Open Working…

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A RENEWED COMMITMENT: INTERNATIONAL MOTHER’S DAY

FEMNET

Felo & Baby

By Felogene Anumo

Exactly eight months ago, September 11, 2014 I was blessed with the most precious gift in this world, a lovely BABY GIRL. Today also marks International Mother’s Day, an occasion to pay tribute and offer gratitude to mothers. Even as I hold her close and cherish all the special memories created and milestones celebrated, my heart bleeds because of the world we live in. A world where systemic inequalities persist, crimes against humanity such as kidnapping of women and girls for sexual and other unlawful purposes, senseless killings and acts of terrorism are the order of the day.

My heart bleeds for the households and families for the 276 girls from the town of Chibok in Borno State, Nigeria who will be denied this opportunity because their daughters have been missing for over three weeks with much inaction from the Government of Nigeria. The same government in…

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The “Dirty” Situation of Women and Girls: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in the Post 2015 Development Framework

FEMNET

 

 

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“The place where we went before is about 6km from here. It was threatening and dirty. It was frightening too so most of the time we went with friends. There are men who are not really nice. When they see lonely women there they rape them or something like that. I know that something like that already happened. I don’t want my daughter to go to that place because I’m afraid of her being raped. I’m teaching her to always use the toilet instead.” -Madeleine is a young mother. Her family recently had a toilet built next to their house[1]

In the developing world, the burden of collecting water, falls disproportionately on women and girls particularly for families without a drinking-water source at home. According to WHO/UNICEF 2012, Sub-Saharan African countries indicated that around 71% of the water collected is done so by women and girls. In…

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Keep Girls in School: No Tax on Sanitary Towels

FEMNET

By  Felogene Anumo

As the prices of items start to go up this week with the VAT Act 2013 taking effect, we would like to commend the move by Parliament and the National Treasury to maintain sanitary towels on the VAT tax-exemption list. Notably, sanitary towels are not luxury items and as such, any tax levied on the products not only claws back on the gains that the country has made in promoting girl child education, but also risks negating the achievement of Millennium Development Goals 2 and 3: (Achieving universal primary education and promoting gender equality and empowering women) and the realization of Kenya Vision 2030.

Education provides life-changing opportunities for many girls and women. Menstruation is the most contributing factor to school absenteeism and poor academic performance among schoolgirls.  Recently, a local Kenyan TV station registered shock waves across the country when they aired a feature: “Period…

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A World Where Every Pregnancy Is Wanted

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

Unsafe abortion is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as a process of terminating pregnancy, carried out either by persons lacking the necessary skills or in an environment that does not conform to minimal medical standards, or both[1]. Evidently, this poses a serious threat to the sexual and reproductive health and lives of women as presented in the recent key findings of a National Study on the Incidence and Complications of Unsafe Abortion in Kenyaled by the African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) and the Ministry of Health, Kenya.

Unsafe abortion continues to be a persistent public health challenge that contributes to 13% of maternal deaths globally and a myriad of short and long term health complications among women in their reproductive age. The largest proportion and highest rate of unsafe abortions currently occurs in Africa. The incidence of unsafe abortions in…

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FEMNET LAUNCHES MEN TO MEN STRATEGY TOOLKIT

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Intern, FEMNET

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On April 26, 2012 in Nairobi, Kenya, The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET) launched “The Men to Men Strategy Toolkit on Working with Men to Combat Gender Based Violence”. The toolkit aims to strengthen programmes that seek to engage with men to combat gender based violence (GBV). The Strategy Toolkit shares information, tools, activities, and skills building ideas and methods to support organizations and individuals to better understand the needs of working with men to address GBV in collaboration with women’s rights organizations inAfrica.

The launch, attended by well over 200 people, was part of the monthly Gender Forum convened by the Heinrich Boll Stiftung (HBS) inKenya. During the gender forum, a team of panelists explored the root causes of GBV by placing it in the context of deconstructing masculinity and femininity. The discussants highlighted why it is critical that…

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