Youth Voices: The Importance of Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health

Girls' Globe

There is a movement stirring in the global community to build a new strategy to address maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health around the world. One of these mechanisms is the proposed Global Financing Facility (The GFF). The GFF in support of Every Woman Every Child aims to contribute to global efforts to improve the lives of women, children. With more resources effectively allocated towards innovative solutions and programs it is estimated that 4 million maternal deaths, 107 million child deaths and 22 million stillbirths can be prevented between 2015-2030 in over seventy countries.

While significant progress has been made to improve the the health of women, children and adolescents, there is still more that needs to be done. Youth voices are vital to this global conversation. Young people around the world are already doing amazing work to empower communities and save lives. Often with little resources, youth are making an enormous impact in…

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If You Treasure It, Measure It: #Commit2Deliver for Women and Girls

Girls' Globe

No country sends its soldiers to war to protect their country without seeing to it that they will return safely, and yet mankind for centuries has been sending women to battle to renew the human resource without protecting them. -Fred Sai, former President of the International Planned Parenthood Federation

Pregnancy is the one of the leading causes of death for girls aged 15-19 in developing countries. Maternal and child mortality remains a big problem for many countries in Africa with young women even more vulnerable. However, almost all maternal deaths can be prevented, as evidenced by the huge disparities found between the richest and poorest countries. The lifetime risk of maternal death in industrialized countries is 1 in 4,000 in comparison to 1 in 51 in countries classified as ‘least developed.’

Why We Cannot Wait

Mothers are the cornerstones of healthy societies. Not only do they give physical birth to new life, they…

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It Takes A Village: Let’s Commit to End Child Marriage

Girls' Globe

By: Felogene Anumo, Advocacy Programme Associate. The African Women’s Development and Communication Network (FEMNET), @Felogene on Twitter

Last week, I joined thousands of maternal and child health advocates at the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) Partners’ Forum in Johannesburg, South Africa. The gathering and robust discussions breathed life into the African Proverb: “It takes a village to raise a child.” The various stakeholders present called for ambitious and transformative commitments to realize the potential to be the ‘village’ that ends early, forced and child marriages in one generation, as this contributes to preventable newborn deaths and maternal mortality.

Until Death Do Us Apart: Facts and Figures

  • One in three girls in the developing world will be married by their eighteenth birthday. This can end their chance of completing an education and puts them at greater risk of isolation and violence.
  • One in seven girls in the developing…

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Youth Voices at PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014

Girls' Globe

We have been present at the PMNCH Partners’ Forum 2014 in Johannesburg, South Africa this week, where close to 200 youth delegates participated and advocated to include youth priorities in the post-2015 agenda. We had the opportunity to be inspired by their leadership and hear their views and recommendations. .

Gogontlejang Phaladi, Botswana

Mohammed Magdy El Khayat, Egypt

Cecilia Garcia Ruiz, Mexico

1. The global community has made significant progress in saving the lives of women and children. What do you think stands out as a key accomplishment?

2. What are some broader economic, health and social benefits from investing in women’s and children’s health?

3. Remaining gaps can be solved through partnership. Globally, where is political will and commitment for children’s health needed most?

Zanele Mabaso, South Africa

Sumaya Saluja, India

Felogene Anumo, Kenya

Felogene reads the youth recommendations that were put together at the Youth Pre-Forum on June 29th, prior to…

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