‘The Bachelor’ Group Date that Nobody is Talking About

The role of media in perpetuating sexism and gender inequalities! SMH.

Girls' Globe

The Bachelor contestants get ready to ride tractors in the bikinis in downtown Los Angeles. Image c/o ABC. The Bachelor contestants get ready to ride tractors in bikinis in downtown Los Angeles. Image c/o ABC.

Okay, I have to confession to make. I watch The Bachelor and I admittedly *guiltily* enjoy it. With my glass (bottle?) of wine beside me, I go into these episodes with an understanding that what I am about to witness will be completely sexist and will inevitably stereotype its female cast members as backstabbers, crazy, drunkards, airheads, damsels in distress, and/or the I’m-here-for-the-right-reasons-and-am-innocently-looking-for-my-one-true-love girl. (Why else would anyone ever want to be cast on a high ranking national television show? Certainly not for the five minutes of fame.)

However, a portion of last Monday’s episode was a little harder to stomach than usual.

Chris Soules, dubbed the handsome and perfect bachelor (a.k.a. Prince Farming…because he lives on a farm, get it?), invited a group of six girls on the season’s first group date with a date card that read…

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If You Treasure It, Measure It: #Commit2Deliver for Women and Girls

Girls' Globe

No country sends its soldiers to war to protect their country without seeing to it that they will return safely, and yet mankind for centuries has been sending women to battle to renew the human resource without protecting them. -Fred Sai, former President of the International Planned Parenthood Federation

Pregnancy is the one of the leading causes of death for girls aged 15-19 in developing countries. Maternal and child mortality remains a big problem for many countries in Africa with young women even more vulnerable. However, almost all maternal deaths can be prevented, as evidenced by the huge disparities found between the richest and poorest countries. The lifetime risk of maternal death in industrialized countries is 1 in 4,000 in comparison to 1 in 51 in countries classified as ‘least developed.’

Why We Cannot Wait

Mothers are the cornerstones of healthy societies. Not only do they give physical birth to new life, they…

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Post 2015 Processes – Opportunity for Kenyan Women?

FEMNET

By Felogene Anumo

The High Level Panel recently presented to the UN Secretary General a report with recommendations of what they envisage for the Post 2015 framework.

The next stage of handing over the process to the UN Open Working Group and Member States leading up to the September Special Session on the MDGs requires vigilance and active engagement. Civil society organizations need to galvanize people to sign on and own this framework to ensure that the text does not get watered down. Women especially stand a lot to gain including especially with the inclusion of a stand-alone gender goal as well as disaggregated indicators in other goals. Eliminating violence against women and ending child marriage are included as indicators and the panel has gone beyond previous commitments to recommend universal access to contraception and sexual and reproductive health rights.

Kenya is a Co-chair to the Intergovernmental UN Open Working…

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The “Dirty” Situation of Women and Girls: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) in the Post 2015 Development Framework

FEMNET

 

 

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“The place where we went before is about 6km from here. It was threatening and dirty. It was frightening too so most of the time we went with friends. There are men who are not really nice. When they see lonely women there they rape them or something like that. I know that something like that already happened. I don’t want my daughter to go to that place because I’m afraid of her being raped. I’m teaching her to always use the toilet instead.” -Madeleine is a young mother. Her family recently had a toilet built next to their house[1]

In the developing world, the burden of collecting water, falls disproportionately on women and girls particularly for families without a drinking-water source at home. According to WHO/UNICEF 2012, Sub-Saharan African countries indicated that around 71% of the water collected is done so by women and girls. In…

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